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Zen Wings vs. Wings Over

Zen Wings vs. Wings Over


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Step 1:

Choose wisely. We picked similar flavors from each restaurant for easy comparison. We got 16 flavors (spicy teriyaki x2), about 10 lbs, and it came to a startling $135.

Zen Flavors: Suicidal, Hot Garlic, mild buffalo, chipotle, Kickin’ Ranch, Kickin’ Cajun, spicy teriyaki and Seriously Spicy.
Wings Over Flavors: After Burner, garlic parmesan, Wimpy Buffalo, sweet chili, Mustang Ranch, Kickin’ BBQ, Cajun blackened, spicy teriyaki and Jamaican Jerk.

Photo by Hannah Burks

Step 2:

Watch the boys flock as the wings start piling up. Take a step back to admire the sheer size of your order. Also notice the Spoon drawing on the second box (as per requested, thanks Zen!)

Photo by Hannah Burks

Step 3:

Open all of the boxes, take a big whiff and fight everyone off so you can take pictures.
Note: Zen is in white boxes, nicely separated and labeled; Wings Over is in the black boxes, kindly separated by wax paper to prevent flavor-mixing (at the demand of a very adamant critic….).

Photo by Hannah Burks

Step 4:

Appreciate the beauty.

Photo by Bari Blanga

Step 5:

Open the gates. Go through each set of comparable flavors–the first we tried were Zen’s Suicidal vs. Wings Over’s After Burner Buffalo. Suicidal won by a landslide. After Burner was basically tarred and feathered.

Photo by Hannah Burks

Step 6:

Admire all your hard work and wash it down with a beer or two. Let’s get to the reviews.

Photo by Hannah Burks

And the winner is… ZEN WINGS & THINGS!

Zen took the W in nearly every flavor. While Wings Over has great chicken, especially bone-in, Zen’s sauces take the cake across the board. The most favored flavors were Zen’s Hot Garlic, Suicidal and Kickin’ Ranch. The least favorite were Wings Over Mustang Ranch (“tastes like a Cool Ranch Dorito”) and After Burner (“waste of time”).

Try these places out for yourself to see which are worth your money and heartburn. Don’t forget napkins!

Zen Wings & Things

Location: 433 E. Beaver Ave, State College, PA 16801
Hours of operation: Mon-Tues: 5 pm- 2:30 am, Wed -Fri: 5 pm – 3 am, Sat: 12:30 pm – 3 am, Sun: 12:30 pm – 1 am

Wings Over Happy Valley

Location: 244 W. Hamilton Ave, State College, PA 16801
Hours of operation: Mon-Fri: 4 pm- 1 am, Sat- Sun: 11 am – 3:30 pm

Impressed? Salivating? Read these related posts:

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View the original post, Zen Wings vs. Wings Over, on Spoon University.

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Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Chicken Wings Vs. Wingettes: What's The Difference?

Chicken wings have become a game day snack staple across America. The National Chicken Council says Americans consume more than a billion of them on Super Bowl Sunday alone. Whether dry-rubbed, doused in barbecue sauce, or served up classic Buffalo style, there's not much to consider when digging into a pile of wings other than where the closest napkins might be. But as it turns out, there's a whole lot more to a chicken wing than being a vessel for your favorite sauce.

You may not know this, but when you're digging into a basket of wings, you're not even really eating true chicken wings. You're actually eating wingettes (and maybe some drumettes, too). So what's the difference?

Whole chicken wings are actually composed of three parts: the drumette, the flat or wingette, and the tip. As The Kitchn explains, The drumettes are the part of the wing that is attached to the rest of the chicken. They look like miniature versions of chicken drumsticks (or legs), hence their name. The wingettes are specifically the middle part of a chicken wing, also known as the flat because of their shape, and consist of two thin parallel bones and dark meat. Finally, the small pointy ends of the wing are called the tips. They're mostly skin, bone, and cartilage. You can sometimes find whole chicken wings in the grocery store, but The Spruce Eats notes it's a lot more common nowadays to find packages of pre-split wingettes and drumettes.


Watch the video: Wings - Over the Top s1e6 - Tim Woodward (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hacket

    Sorry, I pushed this question away

  2. Umar

    Amusing topic

  3. Mochni

    analogues are found?

  4. Both

    Bravo, what words ..., brilliant thought

  5. Koa

    Does not work

  6. Dihn

    Get me fired from this.



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